Reason For Quitting

Reason For Quitting

Here are some examples of reasons to quit:

  • I will feel healthier right away.
  • I will have more energy and better focus.
  • My senses of smell and taste will be better.
  • I will have whiter teeth and fresher breath.
  • I will cough less and breathe better.
  • I will be healthier the rest of my life.
  • I will lower my risk for cancer, heart attacks, strokes, early death, cataracts, and skin wrinkling.

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Q: Why is Quitting So Hard?

Q: Why is Quitting So Hard?

Many ex-smokers say quitting was the hardest thing they ever did. Do you feel hooked? You’re probably addicted to nicotine. Nicotine is in all tobacco products. It makes you feel calm and satisfied. At the same time, you feel more alert and focused. The more you smoke, the more nicotine you need to feel good. Soon, you don’t feel “normal” without nicotine. It takes time to break free from nicotine addiction. It may take more than one try to quit for good. So don’t give up too soon. You will feel good again.

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Think About why you Want to Quit

Think About why you Want to Quit

Decide for sure that you want to quit. Promise yourself that you’ll do it. It’s okay to have mixed feelings. Don’t let that stop you. There will be times every day that you don’t feel like quitting. You will have to stick with it anyway.

Find reasons to quit that are important to you. Think of more than just health reasons. For example, think of:

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Learn to be a non-smoker

Learn to be a non-smoker

It is hard to quit when everything you do reminds you of cigarettes.

Here are some healthy lifestyle choices to try that will make your quitting easier:

    • Change your habits to make smoking difficult, impossible or unnecessary. Try activities such as walking, jogging, swimming, tennis, biking, skiing or skating (whatever the season allows).
    • Maintain a clean taste in your mouth by brushing your teeth frequently, using a mouthwash, or chewing a sugar-free candy or mint.
    • Drink large quantities of water and fruit juices. Try to avoid alcohol, coffee and other beverages that you associate with cigarette smoking.

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    Q: How does smoking affect infants born to mothers who smoke?

    Q: How does smoking affect infants born to mothers who smoke?

    Smoking during pregnancy increases the risk for pregnancy complications, premature delivery, a low birth weight infant, and stillbirth.

    Babies whose mothers smoke while pregnant and babies who are exposed to secondhand smoke after birth are more likely to die from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) than babies who are not exposed to cigarette smoke.

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    Q: What if a person smokes again after quitting?

    Q: What if a person smokes again after quitting?
    Q: What if a person smokes again after quitting?

    Many smokers find it difficult to quit. People commonly quit smoking and then find themselves smoking again, especially in the first few weeks or months after quitting.

    People who smoke after quitting should try again to quit.

    Most people find that they need to persist in their attempts to quit smoking before they quit for good. It may take four or more attempts before smokers are able to quit for good.

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    Q: How can I help someone I know quit smoking?

    Q: How can I help someone I know quit smoking?
    Q: How can I help someone I know quit smoking?

    It’s understandable to be concerned about someone you know who currently smokes.  It’s important to find out if this person wants to quit smoking.  Most smokers say they want to quit. If they don’t want to quit, try to find out why.
    Here are some things you can do to help:

    • Express things in terms of your own concern about the smoker’s health (“I’m worried about…”).
    • Acknowledge that the smoker may get something out of smoking and may find it difficult to quit.

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    Q: Can a doctor, dentist, or pharmacist help a person quit smoking?

    Q: Can a doctor, dentist, or pharmacist help a person quit smoking?
    Q: Can a doctor, dentist, or pharmacist help a person quit smoking?

    Doctors, dentists, and pharmacists can be good sources of information about the health risks of smoking and the benefits of quitting.

    They can describe the proper use and potential side effects of nicotine replacement therapy and other medicines, and they can help people find local quit smoking resources.

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    Q: What are some of the challenges associated with quitting smoking?

    Q: What are some of the challenges associated with quitting smoking?
    Q: What are some of the challenges associated with quitting smoking?

    Quitting smoking may cause short-term problems, especially for those who have smoked a large number of cigarettes for a long period of time:

    • Feeling sad or anxious: People who quit smoking are likely to feel depressed, anxious, irritable, and restless, and may have difficulty sleeping or concentrating.

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