Q: What To Do If You Do Slip?

Quit smoking

Don’t be discouraged if you slip up and smoke one or two cigarettes. It’s not a lost cause. One cigarette is better than an entire pack. But that doesn’t mean you can safely smoke every now and then, no matter how long ago you quit. One cigarette may seem harmless, but it can quickly lead back to one or two packs a day.

Many ex-smokers had to try stopping many times before they finally succeeded. When people slip up, it’s usually within the first three months after quitting. Here’s what you can do if this happens:

Continue reading “Q: What To Do If You Do Slip?”

Q: Why is Quitting So Hard?

Q: Why is Quitting So Hard?

Many ex-smokers say quitting was the hardest thing they ever did. Do you feel hooked? You’re probably addicted to nicotine. Nicotine is in all tobacco products. It makes you feel calm and satisfied. At the same time, you feel more alert and focused. The more you smoke, the more nicotine you need to feel good. Soon, you don’t feel “normal” without nicotine. It takes time to break free from nicotine addiction. It may take more than one try to quit for good. So don’t give up too soon. You will feel good again.

Continue reading “Q: Why is Quitting So Hard?”

Q: How does smoking affect infants born to mothers who smoke?

Q: How does smoking affect infants born to mothers who smoke?

Smoking during pregnancy increases the risk for pregnancy complications, premature delivery, a low birth weight infant, and stillbirth.

Babies whose mothers smoke while pregnant and babies who are exposed to secondhand smoke after birth are more likely to die from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) than babies who are not exposed to cigarette smoke.

Continue reading “Q: How does smoking affect infants born to mothers who smoke?”

Q: What if a person smokes again after quitting?

Q: What if a person smokes again after quitting?
Q: What if a person smokes again after quitting?

Many smokers find it difficult to quit. People commonly quit smoking and then find themselves smoking again, especially in the first few weeks or months after quitting.

People who smoke after quitting should try again to quit.

Most people find that they need to persist in their attempts to quit smoking before they quit for good. It may take four or more attempts before smokers are able to quit for good.

Continue reading “Q: What if a person smokes again after quitting?”

Q: How can I help someone I know quit smoking?

Q: How can I help someone I know quit smoking?
Q: How can I help someone I know quit smoking?

It’s understandable to be concerned about someone you know who currently smokes.  It’s important to find out if this person wants to quit smoking.  Most smokers say they want to quit. If they don’t want to quit, try to find out why.
Here are some things you can do to help:

  • Express things in terms of your own concern about the smoker’s health (“I’m worried about…”).
  • Acknowledge that the smoker may get something out of smoking and may find it difficult to quit.

Continue reading “Q: How can I help someone I know quit smoking?”

Q: Can a doctor, dentist, or pharmacist help a person quit smoking?

Q: Can a doctor, dentist, or pharmacist help a person quit smoking?
Q: Can a doctor, dentist, or pharmacist help a person quit smoking?

Doctors, dentists, and pharmacists can be good sources of information about the health risks of smoking and the benefits of quitting.

They can describe the proper use and potential side effects of nicotine replacement therapy and other medicines, and they can help people find local quit smoking resources.

Continue reading “Q: Can a doctor, dentist, or pharmacist help a person quit smoking?”

Q: What are some of the challenges associated with quitting smoking?

Q: What are some of the challenges associated with quitting smoking?
Q: What are some of the challenges associated with quitting smoking?

Quitting smoking may cause short-term problems, especially for those who have smoked a large number of cigarettes for a long period of time:

  • Feeling sad or anxious: People who quit smoking are likely to feel depressed, anxious, irritable, and restless, and may have difficulty sleeping or concentrating.

Continue reading “Q: What are some of the challenges associated with quitting smoking?”

Q: Should someone already diagnosed with cancer bother to quit smoking?

Q: Should someone already diagnosed with cancer bother to quit smoking?
Q: Should someone already diagnosed with cancer bother to quit smoking?

Yes. There are many reasons that people diagnosed with cancer should quit smoking.

For those having surgery or other treatments, quitting smoking helps improve the body’s ability to heal and respond to the cancer treatment, and it lowers the risk of pneumonia and respiratory failure.

Continue reading “Q: Should someone already diagnosed with cancer bother to quit smoking?”